Walker caught using actors in TV spot, lying about it

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Scott Walker's newest TV commercial appears to be a testimonial from a perfect cross-section of the population who all support him.

They're young and old, black and white, male and female -- and they all deliver their lines very, very well.

Click here to watch it.

They're so good it makes you wonder if some or all of them might be paid, professional actors.

Greg Borowski's first post on the Journal Sentinel political blog said:

Milwaukee County Executive Scott Walker has unveiled a new, upbeat TV ad, one that features a montage of (we presume) voters, all expressing their belief in Milwaukee and in, well Scott Walker.

Borowski, pressed by a "longtime political observer," asked whether actors were used.

Meanwhile, in response to a query about the people used in the Walker ad, Tim Russell of the Walker campaign says all are actual voters. Not actors.

"They're all real people," Russell said.

Before we get to the punch line, watch the Walker ad again, paying close attention to the younger guy with glasses.

Then go to this site and watch TV spot #2. Looks a lot like the same guy, before he cleaned up.

So, the final word from Borowski:

Earlier today, a blog post referenced the newest Scott Walker TV ad. In it, Walker aide Tim Russell said the folks attesting to their belief in Milwaukee -- and in Milwaukee County Executive Scott Walker -- were all "real people."

Now comes this clarification, via email, from Russell:

"I did not intend to say that none of the people in the ad were talent. Our agency had talent on hand for the taping in case our volunteers didn't work out. We had a couple that got stage fright and were replaced with people the agency had on hand. I apologize if I was unclear in my answer."

Talent, of course, is what they call actors in the media biz.

Actors are real people, too, of course. But that wasn't the question Russell was being asked, as he well knew. "Unclear in my answer?" How about disingenuous?

An anonymous commenter on Borowski's final item says, "While they may be real people, one of the people in the ad works as an actor and lives in Chicago."

He believes in Scott Walker because he's paid to. Do you believe in Tim Russell?

Mark Green, you may recall, had a similar problem in his campaign for governor.

AFTERTHOUGHTS: (1) None of this, of course, appeared in the newspaper, only on the JS blog.  (2) If you were a reporter who'd been lied to twice by the Walker campaign, wouldn't you wonder if they are ALL actors, and ask the campaign for the names of the "volunteers" who are in the commercial, so you could contact them to check?