Ron Johnson Admits To Intentionally Deceiving Wisconsin Voters, Reporters

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It's easy to see why Ron Johnson's campaign strategy has been to be to say absolutely nothing to reporters, in the hopes that they will sit back and forget to do their jobs. It's the only safe route for a candidate whose entire campaign is one big lie.

Take this absolutely shocking admission by Johnson which was picked up by Politico's Jim Vandehei in a recent interview:

Guided by GOP insider Curt Anderson, Johnson has poured millions of dollars into what often seems like a rather cautious campaign. In the interview, it was clear the professional handlers have gotten to Johnson. He is very reluctant to engage in specifics on Social Security and Medicare, even though his admiration of and ideological connection to fellow Wisconsinite Rep. Paul Ryan make plain what direction he would head in if elected. [...]

[H]e watches his words, ignoring the fact that he's already making the trade-offs conventional politicians make to win office. It will be different once and if he wins, he promises. Then, his true feelings can take voice. [emphasis added]

The clarity of this admission -- that he deceiving both reporters and voters in Wisconsin so he can get elected -- is indicative of not only a lack of any personal character, but of an untested and unsteady campaign that is not ready for prime time.

And there's more. Steve Benen comments on the creepiness of Johnsons' further comments in the interview:

Is that so. Vote for Johnson in November and then voters will get to see what he's all about. Call me old fashioned, but that sounds backwards.

Elsewhere in the Politico piece, VandeHei asked what kind of innovative ideas Johnson might pursue as a U.S. senator. Johnson skipped right past substantive issues, and committed himself to a "re-education of America."

What does that even mean? Will reporters press him to explain what it does? And if they abdicate that duty, how will Wisconsin voters possibly be able to make an informed decision in this election, when one candidate openly admits he is hiding his "true feelings" and will only reveal them to voters after election day?